In a comprehensive new factsheet, Kaldor Centre Director Jane McAdam outlines what you need to know about the Global Compacts on Refugees and Migrants.

Governments around the world are using militarised border-security missions to turn back asylum seekers at sea, but the strategy does not comply with international law and is not viable over the long-term, according to a new Policy Brief from...

The Kaldor Centre’s next-generation Emerging Scholars Network is a new, global and growing group of early-career scholars focusing on refugee and migration issues.

As record numbers of people around the world are being forcibly displaced,...

Refugee Week is Australia’s peak annual activity to raise awareness about the issues affecting refugees and celebrate the positive contributions made by refugees to Australian society. Originally celebrated in 1986, Refugee Week coincides with...

Latest News

When is a safe zone safe?

07/06/2017

by Geoff Gilbert and Anna Magdalena Rüsch

Are safe zones only ever the least worst alternative for people who cannot flee across an international border?

Seven reasons the UN Refugee Convention should not include 'climate refugees'

Professor Jane McAdam
07/06/2017

Critics of the United Nations Refugee Convention tend to fall into two camps. In one camp are those who think the treaty is too old to respond to the displacement challenges of the 21st century, such as climate change and disasters. In the other camp are those who think the treaty is too generous and somehow responsible for the large numbers of refugees we see around the world today.

Curiously, the convention is somehow too narrow and too broad at the same time; simultaneously blocking yet facilitating access to protection.

Plaintiff M96A and the elusive limits of immigration detention

Sangeetha Pillai
29/05/2017

In Plaintiff M96A/2016 v Commonwealth, the High Court unanimously held that a mother and daughter, who were transferred from detention in Nauru to Australia to obtain medical treatment, were validly held in immigration detention during their treatment. The case is the most recent piece in the evolving jurisprudential puzzle on the constitutional limits of mandatory immigration detention in Australia. This post traces the history of this jurisprudence, and considers the contribution that Plaintiff M96A makes.

Creating Safe Zones and Safe Corridors in Conflict Situations: Providing Protection at Home or Preventing the Search for Asylum?

Curious about whether safe zones can provide real protection? Join Department of Foreign Affairs director Claire Elias, University of Essex law professor Geoff Gilbert and UN lawyer Paul White for a panel discussion and Policy Brief launch hosted by the Kaldor Centre.

WednesdayJun 072017

Risks and rewards in Australia's plan for private sponsorship

16/05/2017

By Khanh Hoang

Australia is set to roll out a new private sponsorship programme for refugees and humanitarian entrants on 1 July, following in the footsteps of Canada. 

The 1969 African Refugee Convention: A Panacea to Mass Movements of Refugees in Africa?

19/04/2017

First published in the Refugee Law Initiative Blog on Refugee Law and Forced Migration, 19 April 2017

by Tamara Wood (Kaldor Centre/UNSW) and Dr Marina Sharpe (McGill) who will both present on the ‘Mass Displacement and Regional Protection Frameworks in Africa’ panel at the upcoming RLI 2nd Annual Conference.

What Australia’s Federal Budget means for refugee policy

Dr Claire Higgins
10/05/2017

Australia’s 2017–18 Federal Budget includes funding for offshore processing and refugee settlement arrangements at an estimated cost of $713,641

The Displacement Project: Perspectives on climate change and planned relocation in the Pacific

Planned relocation is the process by which communities are assisted by the State to relocate away from dangerous areas to safer ones. Can planned relocation play a role in responding to climate change and disasters? What challenges does it pose, both for relocated and host communities? What important lessons can be drawn from historical cases? Join us for an evening with international law expert, Jane McAdam, and political geographer, Jon Barnett, as they present fresh perspectives on these questions.

WednesdayJun 072017

Does it matter how we “stop the boats”?

02/05/2017

Violeta Moreno-Lax questions the triumph of boat turnbacks, deterrence and containment without protection in Australia and Europe.

Do boat turnbacks stack up? New Kaldor Centre Policy Brief evaluates EU and Australian policies in light of international law

02/05/2017

Governments around the world are using militarised border-security missions to turn back asylum seekers at sea, but the strategy does not comply with international law and is not viable over the long-term, according to a new Policy Brief from UNSW’s Kaldor Centre for International Refugee Law.

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