Governments around the world are using militarised border-security missions to turn back asylum seekers at sea, but the strategy does not comply with international law and is not viable over the long-term, according to a new Policy Brief from...

The Kaldor Centre’s next-generation Emerging Scholars Network is a new, global and growing group of early-career scholars focusing on refugee and migration issues.

As record numbers of people around the world are being forcibly displaced,...

Refugee Week is Australia’s peak annual activity to raise awareness about the issues affecting refugees and celebrate the positive contributions made by refugees to Australian society. Originally celebrated in 1986, Refugee Week coincides with...

In a comprehensive new factsheet, Kaldor Centre Director Jane McAdam outlines what you need to know about the Global Compacts on Refugees and Migrants.

Latest News

Get the facts: 5 Kaldor Centre Animations for Refugee Week

21/06/2017

Refugee Week starts conversations, and conversations work best when they begin with facts. Here are some Kaldor Centre animations, made by UNSW TV, to help – each less than one minute:

Get the facts: 5 Kaldor Centre Factsheets for Refugee Week

21/06/2017

Refugee Week starts conversations, and conversations work best when they begin with facts. Here are some Kaldor Centre Factsheets to help:

Get the facts: 5 Kaldor Centre Policy Briefs for Refugee Week

21/06/2017

Refugee Week starts conversations, and conversations work best when they begin with facts.

The Kaldor Centre’s rigorous research on the most pressing displacement issues in Australia, the Asia-Pacific and the world has a role to play in the development of sustainable policies that respect international legal obligations. Here are five Policy Briefs produced by the Kaldor Centre to enhance policy and public understanding.

Get the facts: 5 Kaldor Centre Podcasts for Refugee Week

20/06/2017

Refugee Week starts conversations, and conversations work best when they begin with facts. Here are some Kaldor Centre podcasts to help you get started:

Five Questions: On turning back boats

19/06/2017

Since 2013, the Australian military has routinely intercepted boats and turned back asylum seekers through Operation Sovereign Borders. Likewise in Europe, since the so-called “refugee crisis” began in 2015, the EU’s Frontex-led Operations Sophia and Triton have also taken a deterrence approach. Recent news reports have tracked the deadly consequences. Dr Violeta Moreno-Lax examines the practices in the Policy Brief, The interdiction of asylum seekers at sea: Law and (mal)practice in Europe and Australia. Here she answers five questions about the legal and practical impacts of turnbacks.

Proposed citizenship test would forgo a ‘fair go for all’

19/06/2017

By Khanh Hoang

The Australian Government this week introduced a new Bill into parliament to amend the Citizenship Act 2007. The move comes just two weeks after submissions to its discussion paper had closed – those submissions have not been made public.

In short, the proposed changes will require prospective citizens to apply and be approved for Australian citizenship. Applicants must then make a pledge of allegiance to Australia before they can become an Australian citizen.

Minister to get unprecedented power if Australia’s new citizenship bill is passed

Sangeetha Pillai
16/06/2017

First published in The Conversation.

The government has introduced legislation to reform Australia’s citizenship regime, under the guise of strengthening the integrity of citizenship. The bill, if passed in its current form, confers sweeping new powers on the immigration minister.

Access to Australian citizenship has always involved some executive discretion. But if the bill is passed, the minister will gain unprecedented control over the criteria governing citizenship acquisition, the time it takes for a person to gain citizenship after their application has been approved, and even the circumstances in which citizenship can be revoked.

Offshore detention: What the landmark settlement fails to resolve

Sangeetha Pillai
16/06/2017

First published in The Interpreter.

Australia’s largest ever immigration detention trial has ended before it began, with the largest human rights settlement in Australian legal history. The Australian government and its offshore detention contractors will pay $70 million in compensation to lead plaintiff Majid Kamasaee and 1904 other asylum seekers detained on Papua New Guinea's Manus Island between 2012 and 2016, plus legal costs estimated at $20 million.

The settlement agreement is unquestionably a practical win for the plaintiffs in the case, who stand to receive substantial individual payouts. But it’s also the latest, and largest, lost opportunity to clarify the legal boundaries of Australia's immigration detention.

Time to retire the 1951 Refugee Convention?

09/06/2017

A thoughtful debate shows that information leads to understanding.

Sixty-six years on, is it time to retire the 1951 Refugee Convention? Most people in the 1000-strong crowd gathered at Sydney Town Hall for an Intelligence Squared debate on 6 June were not sure.

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