In a comprehensive new factsheet, Kaldor Centre Director Jane McAdam outlines what you need to know about the Global Compacts on Refugees and Migrants.

The ‘White Australia’ policy was not long gone when the first refugees from communist Vietnam sailed into Darwin Harbour, seeking asylum and inadvertently challenging the Fraser government to reject now-familiar policies such as turnbacks and...

Sydney Event 17 April 2018

Join us in Sydney for a special panel discussion, Refugee Deterrence and Diplomacy: How states influence each other’s asylum policies.

Latest News

5 Questions with Dr Daniel Ghezelbash

16/04/2018

From Europe to Asia, leaders are debating whether to adopt the ‘Australian model’ of pushing boats and asylum seekers out of sight. How did we get here, and where are we heading? The author of 'Refuge Lost: Asylum Law in an Interdependent World', Dr Daniel Ghezelbash, explains.

US border troops can’t stop the need for refugee protection

Dr Claire Higgins
11/04/2018

As President Trump reinforces the US border against a ‘caravan’ of asylum seekers, the international community is seeking innovative pathways for refugees seeking safety.

Boats and Beyond: A frank talk about refugee policy and solutions, presented by the Biennale of Sydney and UNSW’s Kaldor Centre for International Refugee Law

Ai Weiwei’s Law of the Journey, 2017, an imposing installation featuring a 60-metre-long boat crowded with hundreds of anonymous refugee figures, provokes this frank discussion of Australia’s response to asylum seekers arriving by boat – and today’s approach to refugees globally.

What is the relevance of the 1951 Refugee Convention when more people have been forced to flee their homes now than at any time since the World War? How does international law influence domestic politics around the world? What are the repercussions of Australia’s bipartisan policy of offshore processing on Manus and Nauru, and is the country prepared to deal with current crises, such as the Rohingya exodus from Myanmar, or future pressures of people displaced by climate change?

SaturdayMay 262018

Making the Global Compacts Work: What future for refugees and migrants?

Will migrants and refugees move in a safer, better managed international system thanks to two Global Compacts now under negotiation? To examine this question, the Kaldor Centre for International Refugee Law and the New School’s Zolberg Institute on Migration and Mobility, are releasing "Making the Global Compacts Work: What future for refugees and migrants?".

Please join us on 23 April in New York for a special lunchtime conversation to launch this latest in the Kaldor Centre’s milestone Policy Brief series, which brings legal academic rigour to practical contemporary policy questions.

MondayApr 232018

Refugee Deterrence and Diplomacy: How states influence each other's asylum policies

You are invited to this special discussion
with UNSW’s Kaldor Centre for International Refugee Law, Macquarie University Law School,
and the Australian Institute for International Affairs NSW

TuesdayApr 172018

What’s so special about Canada?

15/03/2018

According to University of Toronto Chair in Human Rights Law Audrey Macklin, Canada’s unique program enabling groups of ordinary people to support a refugee’s resettlement is positively transformative – for the refugees, the sponsors, and for their communities and the citizenry at large. We invite you to watch the video from Professor Macklin's presentation 'What’s so special about Canada? How ordinary Canadians successfully sponsor refugees' hosted by the Kaldor Centre on 12 March 2018.

Five Questions: On Canada’s Refugee Sponsorship Program

02/03/2018

Canada’s private sponsorship program seems to tap into the urge of ordinary people to help solve today’s global refugee challenge. Does it work, and is it a model for others?

Exit North: The impact of refugees fleeing Trump’s US for Canada

Dr Claire Higgins
23/02/2018

Since President Donald Trump’s election, Canadian authorities intercepted thousands of people crossing the US border to claim asylum in Canada. Why, and how is this shaping the system in the northern neighbour that vowed to be ‘a compassionate country for refugees and asylum seekers’?

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